The Final Choice is the 600cc Honda Shadow VLX Motorcycle

Since I have had this bike for 2 months now I thought it would be a good idea to post the photos of it. In November we were talking about upgrading my bike and the requirements were pretty specific. The rebel was a great bike for me to learn on because it was a 250cc and was lower to the ground than most mainstream bikes. Whatever bike I was going to look at to replace the rebel had to be roughly the same seat height, but with more power. We were thinking that if I had a more powerful bike we would be able to ride longer distances together (see next post) more comfortably and would be able to ride on the interstate more safely.

The bike we decided to look for was a Honda Shadow VLX. We were thinking that it would take a few months to locate one that we liked and that was reasonably priced. Boy were we wrong! Scott was perusing eBay and came across the exact bike we were looking for and it was even being offered by a dealer. This meant that we could trade in the rebel without having to go through the trouble of trying to sell it. Scott called the dealer who ended the auction and the rest is history. Here she is…

The Final Choice is the 600cc Honda Shadow VLX Motorcycle


Since I have had this bike for 2 months now I thought it would be a good idea to post the photos of it. In November we were talking about upgrading my bike and the requirements were pretty specific. The rebel was a great bike for me to learn on because it was a 250cc and was lower to the ground than most mainstream bikes. Whatever bike I was going to look at to replace the rebel had to be roughly the same seat height, but with more power. We were thinking that if I had a more powerful bike we would be able to ride longer distances together (see next post) more comfortably and would be able to ride on the interstate more safely.

The bike we decided to look for was a Honda Shadow VLX. We were thinking that it would take a few months to locate one that we liked and that was reasonably priced. Boy were we wrong! Scott was perusing eBay and came across the exact bike we were looking for and it was even being offered by a dealer. This meant that we could trade in the rebel without having to go through the trouble of trying to sell it. Scott called the dealer who ended the auction and the rest is history. Here she is…

How To De-Mast a Catalina 22 Sailboat for Towing?

We went to pull the boat out of the lake that had been it’s home for 12+ years on the 29th of November 2006. There are several things we learned that day, as you will see. When we arrived at the lake we made an assessment of the boat and briefly discussed the logistics of getting the boat around to the ramp and on to the trailer. The boat was in a slip that was one full dock away from the ramp. Our first task was to get the motorless boat around the end of this set of slips and then over to the dock that ran out from the ramp, somehow.

As you can see from the photos the weather was just barely cooperating and threatening rain the entire day. To make it even more challenging there was a wind coming from the lake, blowing in toward the cove. As always, providence prevails and just as we were standing on the end of the dock surveying a much larger sailboat that had sunk in the most recent storm and contemplating what to do, a wildlife officer happened by in his nifty little (but immensely powerful) motor boat. Since it was the middle of the week and he seemed quite bored he agreed to tow us around to the dock on the other side. As it turned out this was the least time consuming and easiest part of the entire day.

Boat at ramp dock

Once we had the boat in place we were ready to back down the trailer, or so we thought. We backed it down once only to find out that there was a really good reason the trailer had an extension bar. The trailer was barely in the water and there was no way the boat was going on it that way. So, we hauled it out and went about extending the bar.

Trailer with bar extended

With the trailer extended it was now time to get the boat on it and haul it out of the water. This is easier said than done, especially with a sailboat. When we purchased this boat we were told that the cable that brings the swing keel up was broken and the previous owner did not know if the keel was up or down. Since this is a difference in about 4 foot of draft this was a concern. We knew if we could get it positioned just right the keel would swing up as we pulled the boat on to the trailer if it was down. Odds were that it was. We pulled it up to the end of the trailer where it drifted just off the back edge of the runner.

The keel was indeed down and we know this because the boat promptly got stuck right where it had drifted. Drawing on our past experience of being stuck on the keel of our previous boat we proceeded to rock and roll the boat in an attempt to get it unstuck. This was not working and after about 30 minutes of man-handling Scott decided that if we couldn’t get the boat on the trailer we would put the trailer under the boat. He pulled the trailer out and repositioned it under the boat where we were able to secure the wench to the eye and pull her up onto the trailer. We pulled her out and quickly learned how to put the extension bar back in.

We then began to assess the condition of the boat below the waterline. Twelve years of algae and other “stuff” had built up on her hull. We decided she needed to have a good power washing on the way home.

But first we had to de-mast her. We had not done this before. We had read how to do it and now we had to do it. We loosened all the stays and then disconnected the front three. This freed the mast so that it could be lowered aft and removed from the mast step. We then strapped it down and secured all the lines, stays and anything else that might jump ship.

Once she was de-masted we took her to the closest car wash that had a truck bay. This place was aptly named “Spiffy Car Wash”. I was so amazed at how well she cleaned up. Twelve years of muck washed down the drain. Yea!!

Now that we have her home the plan is to work on her this spring and take her out a few times to the lakes in the area and down to the gulf.

Moving in Day Has Arrived

Moving In

Moving day has come and gone without much fanfare, just how we wanted it to be. We finally got the major contractors to finish up and were able to move in just in time to entertain my parent’s for the Thanksgiving holidays and Scott’s parents for Christmas.

We actually moved in the weekend before Thanksgiving, giving us about 4 days to put up a majority of the house. Luckily, since we were moving from a 40′ x 8′ motor home we did not have a lot of collected stuff to put away. The turkeys for both Thanksgiving and Christmas turned out great, if I say so myself, and the visits were wonderful (see next post).

The bed was our only real piece of furniture and you can see below how ecstatic we were to get it out of the rent house and onto the trailer. We took turns jumping off the back of the trailer onto the bed, somewhat like jumping into a huge pile of leaves. It was a blast!!

Scott in Flight

Me

Before moving anything into the house I went through and took these photos of the finished interior. The floors were so polished and the cleaning crew did such a great job on everything throughout. The first two photos are of Scott unwrapping and unveiling the long awaited wood-burning stove.

The Unveiling

These next two photos are of the great room from the vantage point of the staircase. The door with the large window in it is the front door. We had the front porch screened in as well as the side porch and the results were fantastic. The light through the windows in the morning is fabulous.

Morning Light

Great Room

The kitchen is just the perfect size for the two of us. In fact, I don’t think I would want a kitchen any larger than this. Everything is within reach while cooking and the size makes cleanup a snap. The kitchen is to the left when you walk in the front door. When you go through the kitchen you can go right into the laundry room and then right again into the pantry that is tucked away just below the stairs. We tried to make use out of every conceivable space either for daily usage or storage.

Kitchen

The laundry room is directly across from the refrigerator. When my father in law was touring our house he promptly stopped in front of the refrigerator and surveyed the various buttons. After what seemed like a long pause, he said with a hint of sadness “oh, crushed ice!”. It seems that his refrigerator he had installed last July did not come with this option.

Crushed Ice

Laundry Room

Pantry

View of Great Room from Kitchen

The great room consists of the space from the entry door to the kitchen on the left and the staircase and hallway on the right. Entering through the front door you have the wood-burning stove to your immediate right and the staircase in front of you beginning on the right and going up and to the left to the second floor.

If you pass by the bottom of the staircase and continue through the small hallway to the right instead, you will pass a half bath on the left and end up in the master bedroom. The master bedroom has a full bath with a garden tub and stand alone shower and a walk in closet, too.

Great Room

Staircase and Hallway to Master Bedroom

View from Master Bedroom

Proceeding up the stairs you can see the front door directly under the fan and the two doors to the right (as you are looking at the photo). The door without a window goes to the garage and the door to the far right goes to the dogs’ fenced in yard. This door to the yard is just off the kitchen. There is also another door that goes from the fenced yard to the garage.

Great Room to Garage

Reaching the top of the stairs you can look over the railing into the entire great room, or turn to the right to enter the small hallway that leads to our two upstairs offices. The office on your right is Scott’s and the one on the left is mine. Going through either office you can reach the common bathroom.

Upstairs Hallway and Scott’s Office

My Office

Upstairs Bathroom

Looking Downstairs